wilsfordThe village lies in the north part of the Parish close to the course of the river Avon, at about 350 feet above sea level on the comparatively flat ground of the Vale of Pewsey, and was designated as Conservation Area in 1975 (link to website or PDF document for the Wilsford Area Conservation Statement). The name of the Village is derived from the Old English ‘Wifel’s ford or Wifelesford first recorded in AD.892. The ford itself was a crossing of the river Avon probably situated just south of Cuttenham Farm on the Woodborough Road, where there is now a small road bridge.

The village is exceptional for the number of surviving thatched and timber framed cottages. The form of the village is extended along a lane between two end groups where intervening green spaces between buildings are integral to its character. The east end includes the village centre, presided over by the Parish Church of St Nicholas and the Village Hall.

There are 32 houses in the Village with a population of 70, which is a mixture of retired, work at home or commute to work or school.

Wilsford is extremely proud to have a site of a Neolithic henge located west of the village, (grid reference SU09305732), which was discovered from cropmarks in aerial photographs. The site is included in a three-year investigation of the Pewsey Vale, which began in 2015, by the Department of Archaeology at the University of Reading. Among the discoveries in the 2015 excavations was an early Bronze Age crouched burial of an adolescent child, which included sherds of beaker pottery and a collection of necklace beads. Nearby, within the same field, archaeologists have discovered the remnants of a large Roman farm settlement, and excavations have revealed the outline of a very large farm building or barn. To see the extent of the investigation visit www.silentearth.org/marden-and-wilsford-henges

 

Photo: Alan Maclean

Attachments:
File
Download this file (wilsford_approved_statement.pdf)Conservation Statement